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The J. Paul Getty Museum

With two locations, the Getty Villa in Malibu and the Getty Center in Los Angeles, the J. Paul Getty Museum serves a wide variety of audiences through its expanded range of exhibitions and programming in the visual arts.

The J. Paul Getty Museum's goal is to make its collection meaningful and attractive to a broad audience by presenting and interpreting the collection through educational programs, special exhibitions, publications, conservation, and research.

The Getty Center in Los Angeles houses European paintings, drawings, sculpture, illuminated manuscripts, decorative arts, and European and American photographs.

The Getty Villa in Malibu opened on January 28, 2006, after the completion of a major renovation project. As a museum and educational center dedicated to the study of the arts and cultures of ancient Greece, Rome, and Etruria, the Getty Villa serves a varied audience through exhibitions, conservation, scholarship, research, and public programs.

Los Angeles

United States

Address:
1200 Getty Center Drive
CA
90049-1687
Phone: +1 (310) 440-7330
Fax: +1 (310) 440-7751
Website: http://www.getty.edu/




Permanent Collection

The collection of the J. Paul Getty Museum on display in the galleries at the Getty Center includes examples of pre-20th-century European paintings, drawings, illuminated manuscripts, sculpture, and decorative arts; and 19th- and 20th-century American and European photographs. A small selection of Greek and Roman antiquities can be seen in the Classical Connections gallery in the North Pavilion. In addition, Martin Puryear's site-specific sculpture That Profile (1999), commissioned by the Getty, is located on the Arrival Plaza. The Getty Center also features artist Robert Irwin's Central Garden, designed specifically for the Getty Center. See Gardens for more information.

Galleries
The galleries at the Getty Center are housed in the Museum's five exhibition pavilions, plus the Getty Research Institute Exhibition Gallery. The North Pavilion presents Classical Connections, a small selection of antiquities, as well as paintings and sculpture dating up to 1600 and decorative arts dating up to 1650. The East Pavilion features primarily 17th-century Baroque art, including Dutch, French, Flemish, and Spanish paintings as well as sculpture and Italian decorative arts dating from 1600 to 1800. The South Pavilion houses 18th-century paintings and the majority of the Museum's European decorative arts collection, complete with elaborately furnished paneled rooms, dating up to 1800. The West Pavilion features sculpture and Italian decorative arts of the 1700s through 1900, as well as 19th-century paintings.

The Exhibitions Pavilion features changing exhibitions.

The Getty Villa houses the J. Paul Getty Museum's collection of approximately 44,000 Greek, Roman, and Etr...+ [ Read all ]


Exhibitions

Sigmar Polke: Photographs, 1968–1972
February 20–May 20, 2007

Made for Manufacture: Drawings for Sculpture and the Decorative Arts
February 6–May 20, 2007

French Manuscript Illumination of the Middle Ages
January 23–April 15, 2007

From Caspar David Friedrich to Gerhard Richter: German Paintings from Dresden
October 5, 2006–April 29, 2007

Casting Nature: François-Thomas Germain's Machine d'Argent
July 11, 2006–March 25, 2007

A Renaissance Cabinet Rediscovered
November 22, 2005–August 5, 2007

Classical Connections: The Enduring Influence of Greek and Roman Art
December 16, 2003–December 31, 2008


Previous Exhibitions

Where We Live: Photographs of America from the Berman Collection
October 24, 2006–February 25, 2007

Public Faces/Private Spaces: Recent Acquisitions
October 10, 2006–February 4, 2007

Guercino: Mind to Paper
October 17, 2006–January 21, 2007

A Tumultuous Assembly: Visual Poems of the Italian Futurists
August 1, 2006–January 7, 2007

The Gospels in Medieval Manuscript Illumination
October 31, 2006–January 7, 2007

Enduring Myth: The Tragedy of Hippolytos and Phaidra
August 24–December 4, 2006

Landscape in the Renaissance
August 1–October 15, 2006

Rubens and Brueghel: A Working Friendship
July 5–September 24, 2006

Rubens and His Printmakers
July 5–September 24, 2006

Eliot Porter: In the Realm of Nature
June 13–September 17, 2006

The Colors of Clay: Special Techniques in Athenian Vases
June 8–September 4, 2006

Ensor's Graphic Modernism
May 2–July 30, 2006

Molten Color: Glassmaking in Antiquity
January 28–July 24, 2006

The Cult of Saints
April 25–July 16, 2006

Agitated Images: John Heartfield and German Photomontage, 1920-1938
February 21–June 25, 2006

Carmontelle's Transparency: An 18th-Century Motion Picture
March 14–June 18, 2006

Degas at the Getty
March 7–June 11, 2006

Robert Adams: Landscapes of Harmony and Dissonance
February 7–May 28, 2006

Courbet and the Modern Landscape
February 21–May 14, 2006

The Getty Villa Reimagined
January 28–May 8, 2006

Antiquity & Photography: Early Views of Ancient Mediterranean Sites
January 28–May 1,...+ [ Read all ]


Exhibitions (5)

Click on the images to enlarge

    


Forthcoming exhibitions

Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art: Experimentations in the Public Sphere in Postwar Japan, 1950-1970
March 6–June 3, 2007
At the end of World War II, Japan was left in ruins and in a relative cultural void. Numerous anti-establishment artistic collaboratives emerged during this period, notably Jikken Kōbō/Experimental Workshop, Gutai, Group Ongaku, Tokyo Fluxus, Neo Dada, Hi Red Center, Vivo, Provoke, and Bikyōtō. These collectives eschewed traditional commercial art practice in favor of radical work that provoked its audience conceptually, politically, and socially. In experimenting with new materials and processes of art making and disruption of conventional art forms, the work of these artists reflected the dramatic changes and disjunctive character of everyday life in Japan over the course of two decades following the war. Drawn exclusively from Research Library holdings, the works presented in Art, Anti-Art, Non-Art range from musical scores and photo essays to performance documentation and interactive art kits.

Zoopsia: New Works by Tim Hawkinson
March 6–September 9, 2007
To inaugurate a series of artists' projects at the Getty Museum, internationally recognized Los Angeles-based artist Tim Hawkinson (American, b. 1960) has created four new works for first-time display. Zoopsia offers playful, alternative perspectives on the natural world. Concurrently, Überorgan, described by Hawkinson as a massive, self-playing, walk-in organ of balloons and horns, will be installed in the Museum Entrance Hall for its Los Angeles debut. Previously exhibited in Massachusetts and New York, Überorgan changes with each installation in response to the site. Typica...+ [ Read all ]


Cost

Admission to the Getty Center is FREE—no tickets or reservations required for general admission. Parking is $8.

Admission to the Getty Villa is FREE. An advance, timed ticket is required for each individual. Each Villa ticket allows you to bring up to three children ages 15 and under with you in one car. Parking is $8.


Opening hours

When to visit The Getty Centre:

Tuesday–Thursday and Sunday
10:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m

Friday and Saturday
10:00 a.m.–9:00 p.m

Closed Monday and on January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving, and December 25.


When to visit The Getty Villa:

Thursday–Monday
10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m
Closed Tuesday, Wednesday, and on January 1, July 4, Thanksgiving, and December 25.


Getting there

The Getty Center is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive in Los Angeles, California, approximately 12 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

Location
The Getty Center is located at 1200 Getty Center Drive in Los Angeles, California, approximately 12 miles northwest of downtown Los Angeles.

Driving Directions
The Getty Center is located near the intersection of the San Diego Freeway (Interstate 405) and the Santa Monica Freeway (Interstate 10). Take the Getty Center Drive exit from the 405 and follow the signs.

Parking
Parking reservations are no longer needed or accepted at the Getty Center. Parking is based on availability and is $8 per car. Street parking in the surrounding neighborhood is restricted.

There are designated handicapped-accessible spaces on the entry level of the parking structure.

Getty Center Tram
A computer-operated tram takes you from the street-level parking facility to the top of the hill. Take the elevators in the parking garage up to the Lower Tram Station (T1).

The tram is fully accessible.

Public Transportation
The Getty Center is served by Metro Rapid Line 761, which stops at the main gate on Sepulveda Boulevard. To find the route that is best for you, call (800) COMMUTE or use the Trip Planner on www.metro.net, the Web site of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Drop-off
Passenger drop-offs are permitted from cars or vans carrying 15 passengers or less. Drop passengers off in the designated area located outside of the main parking structure.

Taxis
There is a taxi stop on level P1 of the parking structure.

Direct phone lines to city-licensed cab companies are located on level P1 ...+ [ Read all ]


Facilities

The Getty Center and Villa is ADA accessible to all visitors.

Wheelchairs and Strollers
Standard wheelchairs and strollers are available at the Lower Tram Station and at the coat check desk in the Museum Entrance Hall.

Front and rear row seating is available in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium for visitors using wheelchairs. Please arrive early to reach this area before programs begin. Visitor Services staff are available to assist you.

Sign Language Interpretation
Sign language interpretation is available for all public programs on request. Requests must be made 10 days in advance by calling Visitor Services at (310) 440-7300, or (310) 440-7305 TTY for the deaf or hearing-impaired.

Large Print/Braille
Selected information is available at the Information Desk in the Museum Entrance Hall.

Parking
There are accessible spaces on the entry level of the Getty Center parking structure.

The Getty Tram
The computer-operated tram from the street-level parking facility to the top of the hill is fully accessible.

Assisted Listening Devices
Free listening devices are available for all gallery and architectural tours as well as the Orientation Theater. They are also available for all programs in the Harold M. Williams Auditorium and Lecture Halls.

Assistive Animals
Visitors who require assistive animals, such as guide dogs for the blind, are welcome to bring them to the Getty Center.

Telephones
All payphone banks include an accessible telephone and amplified volume. A TTY public telephone is located in the Museum Entrance Hall.

Restrooms
All public restrooms at the Getty Center include accessible facilities. The family restroom, loca...+ [ Read all ]


Museum internal and external photos (2)

Click on the images to enlarge

   


News and events

February 27, 2007
Courses and Demonstrations
Sculpting the Head (Studio Course)

Tuesday February 27, 2007
1 pm - 5 pm
Museum Studios, Getty Center

Explore a classical approach to sculpting the human head in this three-session workshop with artist Jonathan Bickhart. Working in oil-based clay from a model, participants will learn proportion, anatomy of the facial features, and progressive clay modeling techniques to produce a small bust of any style. Course fee $115; $85 students. Open to 25 participants.
Part One: February 13, 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Part Two: February 20, 1:00-5:00 p.m.
Part Three: February 27, 1:00-5:00 p.m.


Tours and Gallery Talks

Architecture Tour
Tuesdays - Thursdays and Sundays through June 30, 2007
10:15 am, 11 am, 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm
Museum Entrance Hall, Getty Center
This is a 45-minute tour of the architecture and Richard Meier's design of the Getty Center. Meet the docent outside at the bench under the sycamore trees near the front entrance of the Museum.

Collection Highlights Tour
Daily through March 25, 2007
11 am
Museum Galleries, Getty Center
This one-hour tour provides an overview of major works from the Museum's collection. Offered in English and Spanish on weekends. Meet at the Museum Information Desk.

Garden Tour
Daily through June 30, 2007
11:30 am, 12:30 pm, 2:30 pm, 3:30 pm
Central Garden, Getty Center
This is a 45-minute tour of the Getty gardens, including Robert Irwin's Central Garden. Meet the docent outside at the bench under the sycamore trees near the front entrance of the Museum.

Focus Tour: Baroque Art
Tuesdays through February 27, 2007
1:30 pm
Museum Galleries, Getty Center


...+ [ Read all ]


FAQ's

Do I need a parking reservation to come to the Getty Center?
No. Parking reservations are no longer required at the Getty Center, but parking is based on availability.

Do I have to pay admission to the Getty Center?
No. Admission to the Getty Center is free. However, there is a $8 per car parking fee.

Are pets allowed at the Getty Center?
No. Pets are not allowed on the Getty Center grounds or in the parking areas. Assistive animals, such as guide dogs for the blind, are permitted.

Is it true you have to pay to park at the Getty Center?
Yes. While admission to the Getty Center is free, there is a $8 parking fee for all cars.

If I make a reservation for an event or the restaurant, do I still need to pay for parking?
Yes. While admission to the Getty Center is free, there is a $8 parking fee for all cars.

Is there parking in the neighborhoods surrounding the Getty Center?
Street parking in the neighborhoods is restricted.

What are my public transportation options?
The Getty Center is served by Metro Rapid Line 761, which stops at the main gate on Sepulveda Boulevard. To find the route that is best for you, call (800) COMMUTE or (800) 252-9040 (TDD) or use the Trip Planner on www.metro.net, the Web site of the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority.

Can I just be dropped off and walk in?
Yes. Passenger drop-offs are permitted from cars or vans of 15 passengers or less. For safety reasons, passengers should be dropped off in the designated area located outside of the main parking structure.

Can I ride my bicycle or motorcycle to the Getty Center?
Yes. Motorcycles and bicycles may be parked on the entry level of the Getty ...+ [ Read all ]


Education

Planning a School Visit
Bring your class to the Getty Center or the Villa. Arrange for a Guided Lesson taught by a Museum educator, a docent-led site tour, or lead your class through the galleries independently. The Getty Museum offers Guided and Self-Guided School Visits for the 2006–2007 school year at both the Getty Center in Brentwood and the Getty Villa in Malibu.

Requests for each location are handled separately. Click "Get details" below for details about the programs, requirements, and request forms for each location.

The two locations include works of art from different periods in art history. More information about the collections and architecture of both locations, and about visiting, is available in the Visit section of this Web site.

For full information on the broad resources for children and teachers please see, http://www.getty.edu/education/


Schools

Teacher Programs and Resources
The Getty Museum offers workshops and professional development programs that help you incorporate the study of art into your classroom.

Professional Development Opportunities
The Getty Museum offers workshops and professional development programs that help you incorporate the study of art into your classroom.

A Guide to Building Visual Arts Lessons
The Getty Museum Education department has created this guide to help teachers and curriculum developers create successful arts-focused lessons.


Children

Travel the world in search of art treasures! Compete against others or against yourself while you get to know works of art from the Getty Museum.

Whyville (www.whyville.net) is an online world where kids can chat with other kids from all over the globe and earn a salary of "clams" by playing games. Use your clams to create your own face, build a house, and even start your own business. The games on Whyville are fun because they give you real-world problems to solve.

Whyville has been around since 1999 and most of the games are about scientific problems. But now the Getty has added games about art!

Here are some more of the things you can do on Whyville:
Build a rocket launcher that will get the Space Shuttle to the Space Station safely.

Rescue aliens trapped on Earth by using the sun to locate them.

Help discover a cure for WhyPox, a contagious disease that has hit Whyville.

Play Chinese Checkers, Mancala, Tic-Tac-Toe and other games against real people.

Become a citizen of Whyville today!


Students

College and university faculty are encouraged to bring their classes to the Getty Museum. Faculty may teach in the galleries or make special arrangements for a visit facilitated by Museum staff.

College Group Reservations
Make a reservation to bring your class to the Getty Museum. If you would like a visit facilitated by Museum staff, see "Facilitated Visits" below.

At the Getty Center:
Call (310) 440-7300 and tell the reservations agent the date and time of your visit, the number of students, and the number of parking spaces needed. If sufficient group parking is available for that date, your parking fees ($8 per car) will be waived. Bus parking can be arranged, but is limited.

At the Getty Villa:
Call the Education Department at (310) 440-7660 to make arrangements at least two weeks in advance. Reservations are available for Mondays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays. We encourage you to bring your class on a Wednesday, when the Villa is closed to the public and reserved for educational use. There is a $8 parking fee per car.

Teaching in the Galleries
Please obtain an "Educator" badge before conducting class discussions in the galleries. Be prepared to show valid instructor identification. Please limit teaching in the galleries to groups of 25 or fewer students.

At the Getty Center:
Get an "Educator" badge at the security desk adjacent to the Museum Entrance Hall (staff at the round Information Desk can point you to it). For more information on teaching in the galleries at the Getty Center, please call (310) 440-7222.

Facilitated Visits
College and university faculty may arrange a visit facilitated by Museum staff. These visits are tailored to the needs ...+ [ Read all ]